2 Ways to Tick Things Off Your Someday List

2 Ways to Tick Things Off Your Someday List

If you find yourself putting off those things you’ve always wanted to do to that imaginary day called ‘Someday’, read on to learn two ways you can start ticking those items off your Someday List. Unless we take action today, Someday never comes.

We all have a someday list. For our personal life, maybe it looks something like this:

Someday, I will learn how to play the piano.
Someday, I will learn a second language.
Someday, I will get fit and healthy.
Someday, I will learn how to salsa dance.

and for work/business life:

Someday, I will work on improving my own business.
Someday, I will learn how to use that software properly.
Someday, I will take that presentation skills course.
Someday, I will outsource some of these jobs.

But something always gets in the way of “Someday” and your Someday List becomes a ‘Things I Wish I Did’ list.

Yes, you’ve been wanting to learn a new language for 20 years now, but that doesn’t mean you can’t start.

"The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now." ~ Chinese Proverb.

Here are two ways you can start ticking things off your Someday List.

1. Embrace The Magic of Habit

Make that someday item into a habit. Do it regularly and before you know it, it’s no longer something you’ll do someday, it becomes something you’ve done or are regularly doing.

Take learning a language as an example. With the free Duolingo app, you can learn so many different languages. All you need is your mobile phone and a few minutes of your time each day. Easy peasy, right?

Not quite, the missing ingredient is your trigger. You need to have something that will trigger you to open the app and do your lesson. This is where your existing habits can help you to form new habits.

What do you do every day, without fail? For a lot of us, that would be to turn on your computer. If you have a lot of software, it can sometime take some time for everything to load up. That would be an ideal time to open your phone and do a 5-minute language lesson.

It can work with most anything.

Someday, I will work on improving my own business.
Trigger: Sitting down at your desk, before you start work for the day*.
Action: Do some action to move your business forward. Set up a new lead magnet, research a new product idea etc.
* This works like “Pay yourself first” when budgetting – instead of paying all your bills first and then seeing what’s left for savings, you transfer a set amount for savings before you allocate the rest of your income to bills and living expenses. When it comes to your work day, you know that you will always get your regular work done, but if you leave working on your business to fit in with your other work, it will never happen.

Someday, I will learn how to use that software properly.
Trigger: Sitting down on the train for the hour-long commute to your office.
Action: Open your laptop and read through tutorials on how to use the new software you’ve been meaning to master.

Someday, I will learn how to play the piano.
Trigger: You’ve set the pasta on to boil
Action: Go to the old keyboard that your children have abandoned, fire up JoyTunes on your iPad and do a piano lesson while you wait for the pasta to cook.

Someday, I will get fit and healthy.
Trigger: You’ve finished brushing your teeth before bed
Action: Lay out your trainers and workout clothes where you will see them, then set your alarm.

Trigger: When the alarm goes off.
Action: Say in your head, “five-four-three-two-one” (borrowed from Mel Robbins‘ 5-Second Rule) and get out of bed, put your clothes/shoes on and go for a walk.

Trigger: You’re making lunches for the kids
Action: Make your own healthy salad for lunch and leave it in the fridge. When lunchtime rolls around and you are hungry, you won’t go for an unhealthy option, because your salad is already made.

There are so many possibilities!

Here’s a Helpful HocusPocus I shared previously, that sums this idea up nicely.

Unless we take action today, 'Someday' never comes. Here are two ways you can start ticking things off your Someday List. Click To Tweet

 

2. Take the Next Action

The second way to make progress on your Someday List is to take one small step towards getting started. To borrow a concept from David Allen’s Getting Things Done®, identify your next action.

Someday, I will learn how to salsa dance.
Next Action: Google salsa dance lessons in your area.
Then, once you’ve done that, identify another next action you will take. It could be to call the dance studio. And so on, until you eventually find yourself in the arms of a handsome stranger moving to the rhythms of the latest Latin beats (or in the arms of your husband in the community hall, bumping into your neighbour, but who am I to quash your dreams?)

Someday, I will take that presentation skills course.
Next Action: Find out about the Toastmasters meeting in your area.

Someday, I will outsource some of these jobs.
Next Action: Contact that Virtual Assistant. What was the name – magic something? Oh that’s right, Magic VA Solutions! You see what I did there? 🙂

You get the picture. Now your next action is to pull out your Someday List and start ‘habiting’ and ‘next-actioning’ your way through it!

It’s Your Turn

Some of these examples I’ve used are actually on my Someday List. I’d love to hear about some of the things on your list. Please share them in the comments.

Should I be on Facebook? And what should I share?

Should I be on Facebook? And what should I share?

A conversation at the dentist’s office ultimately moved to the topic of Facebook. It got me to thinking that a question small business owners should be asking is whether Facebook is the right platform to market their business. Also included here, are some tips on what sort of content to share on this platform.

While my son was having a dental check-up, my dentist and I got to talking about various topics of conversation: the royal wedding (Did I watch it? No I didn’t), flossing (when is a good time for a young person to start? Now is good), and ultimately we ended up talking about Facebook. He said that his practice has a Facebook page, because it seems like the thing he ought to be doing. However, he was at a loss as to what he should be sharing on his page.

This brought two questions to mind:

1. Should he be on Facebook (or any social media channel for that matter) just because it’s the done thing?

With any sort of marketing, the focus should be on your target customer. Does your ideal customer hang out in that space? Chances are a lot of people do hang out on Facebook, but are they your target customer, and is it the right place to talk about your products?

For example, if you are a company that sells semi-conductors to electronics manufacturers, do you think Facebook is the place to market your product?

On the other end of the spectrum, if you are a company that has created a fun gaming app, such as Candy Crush, should you be promoting your app on LinkedIn – a place for busy professionals? Maybe some other channel might be more appropriate.

In this instance, it is a dental practice, and I think that Facebook is a useful platform for him to be on. Everybody needs to keep their teeth healthy.

Should your small business be on Facebook? This is a question worth asking before jumping on the bandwagon. Click To Tweet

 

2. If so, what sorts of things should he be sharing?

Remember that during the conversation we had while my 14-year old son was in his chair, I asked my dentist when my son should start flossing. See that right there? That is a question that I –his customer– had, and probably a lot of other parents have the same question.

Here are some ideas of what he could share:

  • A blog post talking about the various stages of a child’s dental health.
  • Share an image of a pre-teen with too much space between their teeth to warrant flossing vs someone who is ready to start that routine.
  • The benefits of flossing and the consequences of not doing it.
  • A video on how to floss correctly.
  • A quick tip on how to get your teen to floss.

Images are great to share, and video works even better. Facebook loves video.

The key is to think about your prospective customer and share content that will solve his or her problems. Be generous with your help and avoid being self-centred with what you share. People are not interested in sales talk, and they don’t care what you had for lunch (unless you are a foodie blogger, then that definitely should be on your list of things to share 😀).

The 7 ‘BE’s of Communicating with Your Virtual Assistant

The 7 'BE's of Communication with your Virtual Assistant

When you engage a Virtual Assistant, it’s not like hiring a member of staff who sits alongside you in your office. The VA may not be in the same city or even country. He or she may be in a different time zone altogether. This person can’t interpret your body language or tone, and he or she cannot ask you questions easily if your instructions are unclear. This means that effective communication with your Virtual Assistant is critical.

Here are the 7 ‘be’s for effective communication with your VA.

1. – BE thorough – When you’re giving instructions for the tasks you’d like completed by your VA, imagine you were doing the task yourself for the first time – what information would you need to complete the task effectively?

2. – BE-ware of tone – When communicating via email, the recipient of your correspondence is unable to judge tone or read your body language. Something that would be fine to say when you are face-to-face and are able to smile and place inflection in your voice, might come across as offensive or curt in text. It’s always good to re-read your email to ensure it is conveying the right message to your Virtual Assistant. This applies to all email correspondence really! The use of exclamations marks, humour and emoticons can also build rapport with your Virtual Assistant.

3. – BE responsive – In the instance where instructions are unclear or further clarification is required, it’s important to remember that without this input from you, task completion may be delayed. If you receive email from your VA seeking more information, try to respond in a timely manner.

4. – BE verbal – While communicating solely by email can work, and does happen in this highly connected world, it is ideal to have a verbal conversation every so often. This conversation can be via Skype, telephone or in person (if you both are geographically close to one another). It is great for maintaining a healthy working relationship and for updating each other on any news that might not get covered in email correspondence.

5. – BE informative – Give updates to your Virtual Assistant on what is happening with your business. You never know when this sharing of information might prompt your VA to offer you some helpful advice or valuable insight. Remember your Virtual Assistant has experience of working with small businesses like yours and may be able to shed some light on something you are struggling with (keeping within the limits of confidentiality of course!)

6. – BE clear on time sensitivity – Your Virtual Assistant has other clients to whom he or she provides services. It is very helpful to know whether a task is of an urgent nature at a first glance. If you would like a quick turnaround on a task, make it obvious – one client places [Time Sensitive] in the subject heading of her urgent emails so those messages get read and actioned immediately. Try not to overuse this, if your email messages are not really urgent, but you consistently mark them as such, the technique loses its effectiveness.

7. – BE appreciative – It doesn’t hurt to say thanks or give positive feedback. Everybody enjoys a pat on the back every once in a while!

So if you communicate well with your VA, you both may enjoy a productive and cooperative working relationship for many months or years to come!

Now it’s your turn, do you have any tips to add to the above list?

 

The 7 ‘BE’s of Communicating with Your Virtual Assistant

A Twitter Tale That Will Make Your Skin Crawl

A Twitter Tale That Will Make Your Skin Crawl

Just a bit of tongue-in-cheek fun for Halloween. Ever find yourself plagued with the spam and the visual noise coming from Twitter users who are there just to make a quick buck? If so, you might relate to this terrifying tale of Twitter.

Once upon a time, there was a savvy business woman, named Sarah, who recognised the value of being on social media to promote her small business. It was her first venture into the Twitterverse. She was filled with anticipation as she wondered what fantastic opportunities awaited her.

Sarah’s First Twitter Encounter

Her first encounter was with Bob. His profile looked interesting, with not an egg, but a smiling photo of a real person. Looking at his Twitter stream, he seemed to be knowledgeable and friendly. No sooner had she clicked on the ‘Follow’ button, when suddenly out of nowhere there came a ping notifying her of direct message in her inbox. Eager to read the message she had received, thinking that here was a real opportunity to connect, she was horrified to learn that it was simply an automated message from Bob, asking her to ‘like’ his Facebook page with the words “message sent by DMRobot” tacked on to the end. She clicked away as fast as she could. Ugh! How ghastly!

A New Follower Touting New Followers

Then, she noticed she had a new follower. Her first follower! How exciting! His name was Jack. Clicking on the link to the Jack’s profile page, she was confronted by a barrage of words in his header image and bio, telling her to “Buy 10,000 Twitter followers for $1!” “Buy Twitter Likes now!” “Cheap Retweets” “Only $1”. Oh no! It was enough to make her skin crawl.

The Fickle Follower

Wait a minute – here was another follower! Surely, this would be a real connection, not just someone trying to sell her fake followers. The person was named Karen and she had a lot of followers of her own, so she would know how to use Twitter, and maybe Sarah could learn a few things. She clicked ‘Follow’. Not much time had passed, and she noticed that the “Follows You Back” had disappeared from Karen’s profile. Really?! Karen just wanted to boost her own follower count?! What a gruesome thing to do!

Reduce Your Man Boobs

Next, she came across someone who tweeted the same affiliate link over and over again. “Click here to reduce your man boobs”. How terrifying!

Must’ve Been An Amazing Tweet

Another had 50,000 followers and only 1 tweet. Obviously a customer of Jack.

Overly Grateful

Then she saw someone whose entire Twitter stream consisted of “Thanks for the follow” to the various people who must have followed back. Utterly dreadful!

A Beautiful Twiendship

Just when Sarah wanted to run screaming from her office, vowing never to return to the Land of Twitter, she spied a notification alerting her to another follower. She looked at “Lisa’s” profile and saw that Lisa was engaged in conversations with a lot of different people. She shared amusing and useful things and seemed to be having a lot of fun using Twitter. Sarah clicked ‘Follow’ and tentatively sent a reply to one of Lisa’s tweets. A few moments later, Lisa replied back! Sarah and Lisa spent the next little while exchanging tweets, and it was the beginning of a beautiful twiendship.

Now when Sarah comes across people who use slimy sales tactics, sell Twitter followers and churn followers, she clicks past them and seeks out real people who want to connect, like what you’re meant to do on “social” media.

Capturing Hex Codes: How do I use that colour on my site?

How to Capture Colours on the Web Using Colorzilla

All colours that you see on the internet are represented by a six-digit/letter code called a hex code (e.g. white is #FFFFFF, red is #FF0000 and black is #000000) This code is how the browser knows what colour to render your web elements.

Have you ever come across a colour on another site that you really liked and would like to replicate on your own web page? Or perhaps you’re wanting to add some text to your blog post that is the same colour as other elements on your web page? What about in adding colourful text to photos?

You can capture the code of any colour that you see on your web browser using a free add-on called Colorzilla. Colorzilla is available for both Mozilla Firefox and Chrome browsers.

It is easy to install and to use. The following instructions will help you install it on your Firefox browser.

In your browser window, choose Tools->Add-ons from the top menu. This will open up the Add-ons Manager.

In the search window at the top right of the page, search for ‘Colorzilla’.

Find Colorzilla in the search results and click on Install.

Searching the Add-On Manager for Colorzilla

The add-on will install and prompt you to restart your browser.
Restart the browser and voilà, the add-on is now installed.

Colorzilla is now installed.

 

To use the tool, open up a web page where you would like to capture a specific colour.

Click on the dropper tool to the right of the browser toolbar.

Use the dropper tool to select the colour you want.

 

Hover your mouse pointer over the element on the page where you’d like to capture the colour and left-click.

Capturing the hex code of your desired colour.

 

The hexcode has now been copied to your clipboard and you can paste the code wherever you like. You can provide the hex code to your Virtual Assistant for use in email broadcasts or web pages, or if you are doing it yourself, you can use it in WordPress and most content management systems to colour your text with your chosen hue.

Colorzilla isn’t just for hex codes. In Microsoft Office software, if you want to use a specific colour for text you need to use RGB codes (e.g. White is R=255, G=255, B=255). Colorzilla captures RGB codes too.

If you found this post useful, please share it on Twitter, Facebook or Google+.

How to outsource your social media management

How to outsource your social media management (1)

If you’ve been thinking about outsourcing your social media management, but have been uncertain how to do it well and how to make sure that it delivers results for your business, here are 6 important steps for making it work for you.

Have you been considering outsourcing your social media management, but have been worried about how exactly the person supporting you will know what’s best for your business?

How will what they post day to day on your Facebook or Instagram timeline be good for your business?

Hopefully, you already know the answer to that question because you have a digital marketing strategy in place, or at the very least a social media content strategy. If you’re embarrassed because you don’t even know what those two things are, then this post is for you.

Let’s make things really, really simple.

Social media is there not just to be social and look pretty, although that is one of its uses. Social media is primarily there to add value and profit to your business.

Social Media Outsourcing

When you decide to outsource your social media management to a virtual assistant make sure that at the very beginning you sit down together and work out:

1.What do you want to achieve? – and this may change over time – week to week, or month to month. This may also vary throughout the day, or week.

  • More sales?
  • More subscribers to your newsletter?
  • More people through your door?  (if you’re a bricks and mortar business)
  • More people attending your events?
  • More likes for your Facebook page (and if so, ask yourself why is that important to you?)
  • More brand awareness?

2. What kind of client do you want to attract?

  • Depending on the clients you want to attract you will post different content.
  • Do your research – Facebook Page insights will tell you at what time of day specific types of clients (age and gender) use Facebook. You can then time your posts to reach those clients.

3. What action do you want the client to take when they see your social media post?

  • Do you want them to call you?
  • Visit your store?
  • Admire your goods.
  • Subscribe to your mailing list.
  • Make an appointment.
  • Get to know you better.

4. What kind of posts do you want your VA to create?

  • How much input do you want into what is posted on a daily basis? Do you want to approve each post on each social media channel, or will you let your VA run the show as long as it’s within the strategy?
  • Will they consist mostly of images – how will they create them?
  • Will they have regular access to your premises if they need to take photos of your “behind the scenes” or products?
  • What kind of text only posts and links will they post? Will you supply them, or will your VA need to research to post relevant article links?

5. Which parts of your strategy will address the getting to “know, like and trust” you components of your marketing strategy?

6. How will you measure the results of your VA’s work?

  • You might want to ask your clients – how did they hear about you when they make a purchase or make an appointment and listen for mention of social media.
  • Do you have a measurable way of tracking sales from the date of the start of your social media strategy implementation?
  • Ask clients to share photos of themselves with your products, if appropriate, using a hashtag you’ve chosen.
  • Ask clients to share their experiences of your business/product or service using your unique hashtag. You can then track the use of the hashtag on a weekly basis across Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Social Media Strategy

Once you have answers to these 6 questions, bring all the information together as your social media management strategy. This should clearly define the purpose, implementation and measurement of your social media management. It  should also contain enough information for both you AND your VA to feel confident that they are fulfilling your business goals when they are creating your social media posts on a daily basis.

Make sure you have a weekly check-in with your VA to see how things are going. Before you go into that meeting spend 10-15 minutes going over your business’s social media posts for the week so you know what’s been happening. Together, discuss what’s worked and what hasn’t.  Try to work out why. Decide on a plan for the next week, including any paid campaigns.

If you follow this planned approach, outsourcing your social media management should be a breeze.